Blog

Gen-Y Picks Societal Development Over Profit

In a recent study of over 1,000 of their global Gen-Y population, Deloitte discovered that 92% don’t think success in business should be measured purely by profit. In fact Gen-Y favor innovation, and societal development (56%, and 51%) as a measuring stick for success. 52% of Gen-Y believe that the business sector will have the greatest impact of solving issues plaguing our society, and a whopping 86% of Gen-Y believe that business have the same if not more potential than the government to solve our greatest challenges.

While you could argue that Gen-Y employees would have that sentiment, I think there is a far greater narrative here. As a Gallup poll shows, faith in the government is at an all time low. The frequent stalemates that occur in Washington don’t allow for real progression when it comes to tackling larger societal issues. There will always be red tape in any sector you work in, however it is much easier to push new ideas forward in business. Business allows you to collaborate, compromise, and be inspired by your competitors, in a way that the Government cannot. Combined with the vast resources available to businesses, you actually have a better recipe for success.

Now looking at the first figure, Gen-Y is ready to change the way we measure success in business, and also use business to change the world. Sounds great right? So what’s the problem? Well also according to this study, business leaders don’t fully agree. 71% believe that success shouldn’t be measured by profit, and 35% feel that the business sector will have the biggest impact on solving societies challenges. Clearly a disconnect exists between what Gen-Y expect of business leaders, and what business leaders believe can be expected of them.

If we are able bridge that gap, and empower leaders to strive for innovation and societal changes, maybe we can prove Gen-Y are right in believing that business holds to keys to our future. According to the study, these beliefs stay pretty consistent regardless of geographic differences. What is being represented here are global beliefs on a small scale. If we can expand on this idea on an international level, according to Gen-Y, we should be able to solve some of the larger problems not just affecting our society domestically, but those abroad

Millennial Branding Gen-Y & Facebook Study

Subscribe to our Premium Gen Y Research service for exclusive content
or purchase the full white paper of this study.

Millennial Branding Survey Reveals that Gen-Y is Connected to an Average of 16 Co-Workers on Facebook

Young people are using Facebook for personal over professional reasons, yet they are ‘friending’ their coworkers.

A new study by Millennial Branding, of 4 million Gen-Y Facebook profiles from Identified.com‘s database of 50 million, uncovers that Gen-Y (ages 18 to 29) is inadvertently using their profiles as an extension of their professional personality, even though they are socializing with family and friends. 64% of Gen-Y fails to list their employer on their profiles, yet they add an average of 16 co-workers each to their ‘friend’ group.

Continue reading “Millennial Branding Gen-Y & Facebook Study” »

Personal Branding in the Workplace

Recently, I was interviewed by The Daily Beast about a new lawsuit that threatens the use of social media in the workplace. Employees should be able to build their personal branding using social media tools and not be obligated to hand over their profiles when they depart. In this case, Noah Kravitz, an employee at Phonedog.com in a social media role was sued $340,000 ($2.50 per each of his 17,000 followers per month) by his company after departing. There was no written agreement but supposedly there was a verbal one.

The only issue I find with this case is that Noah had the name “@Phonedog_Noah,” which means that he was obviously using his account on his company’s behalf and his company’s name was helping him build a following by association. If Noah loses his account, it will hurt his career. Phonedog.com will yield no results from his account because Noah’s followers care about him and have no relationship with his company. The case has been brought to court and lets hope it’s dropped because no one will ever want to work for Phonedog.com again (especially Gen-Y!).

I’ll be writing a piece of TIME.com soon about this issue and I’ve already interviewed several corporations to get their takes.

Page 10 of 11« First...7891011